Speaking through the eyes of machines

Looking through the eyes of machines exhibition image ‘To Be Is To Be Connected’ by Matilda Scott

 

Next week (25th -28th April 2017) I will be speaking at the Faculty of Fine Arts of the Universidad Complutense de Madrid who are working with the The Ankaria Foundation as part of a pioneering program to promote young graphic artists in Spain. The week long invitation is part of an international seminar that builds upon the Looking through the eyes of machines project – previously initiated as part of a student exchange exhibition between MICA and UWE in 2016.

The continuation of the student project will include UCM Fine Arts students and others from various Spanish and international educational institutions. Fifteen students will participate in the project, whose graphic projects have previously been selected by a committee of experts, including the director of the Ankaria Foundation, Isabel Elorrieta, and the vice-dean of culture of the Faculty of Fine Arts, Margarita González. The aim of the symposium is to promote the creation and dissemination of creative and research work on contemporary graphic art and its relationship with technologies.

 

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Collaborative Print Practice

g&e Grabado Edicion Magazine 2017 (Background image by Jay R Simpson)

Laidler, P (2017) Collaborative Print Studio, g&e Print and Art Edition Magazine (www.grabadoyedicion.com), ISSUE 55, pp 27 – 40 ISSN 1886-2306.

 

The article Collaborative Print Studio in the March 2017 edition of the ‘g & e Print and Art Edition Magazine’ discusses the concept of the master printer and the collaborative model within the discipline of Printmaking. These precedents are then described in relation to the introduction of digital technologies and the development of a specialist digital print studio that I initiated at the Centre For Fine Print Research (UWE) in 2013.

Abstract
The collaborative print studio has had profound impact upon the production and realisation of some of the most innovative prints within the discipline of fine art printmaking. Historically an artist with little understanding of the print process or access to print facilities could seek the technical knowledge and craft sensibilities from a master printer. In some instances, these unique collaborative pursuits redefined production methods and push the boundaries of what was previously thought possible. These historical precedents have been established through mechanical modes of production and have contributed to defining the roles, expectations, production, publication and artisanship of the collaborative print studio.

Complete text can be viewed on the UWE Repository

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